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Lacerate

- Verb

To tear; to rend; to separate by tearing; to mangle; as, to lacerate the flesh. Hence: To afflict; to torture; as, to lacerate the heart.


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  • BL Lacertae

    BL Lacertae or BL Lac is a highly variable, extragalactic active galactic nucleus (AGN or active galaxy). It was first discovered by Cuno Hoffmeister in 1929, but was originally thought to be an irregular variable star in the Milky Way galaxy and so was given a variable star designation. In 1968, the "star" was identified by John Schmitt at the David Dunlap Observatory as a bright, variable radio source. A faint trace of a host galaxy was also found. In 1974, Oke and Gunn measured the redshift of BL Lacertae as z = 0.07, corresponding to a recession velocity of 21,000 km/s with respect to the Milky Way. The redshift figure implies that the object lies at a distance of 900 million light years.

  • 4 Lacertae

    4 Lacertae is a single star in the northern constellation Lacerta, located about 1,900 light years away. This object visible to the naked eye as a white-hued star with an apparent visual magnitude of 4.55. It is moving closer to the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of −26 km/s. This star is a suspected member of the Lac OB1 association.

  • EV Lacertae

    EV Lacertae

    EV Lacertae (EV Lac, Gliese 873, HIP 112460) is a faint red dwarf star 16.5 light years away in the constellation Lacerta. It is the nearest star to the Sun in that region of the sky, although with an apparent magnitude of 10, it is only barely visible with binoculars. EV Lacertae is spectral type M3.5 flare star that emits X-rays.

  • 14 Lacertae

    14 Lacertae is a binary star system in the northern constellation Lacerta, located around 1,600 light years away. It has the variable star designation V360 Lacertae; 14 Lacertae is the Flamsteed designation. The system is barely visible to the naked eye in good seeing conditions, having a peak apparent visual magnitude of 5.91. It is moving closer to the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of −16 km/s.

  • 9 Lacertae

    9 Lacertae is a single star in the northern constellation Lacerta, located 172 light years away from Sun. It is visible to the naked eye as a faint, white-hued star with an apparent visual magnitude of 4.64. This object is moving further from the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of +10 km/s.

  • CP Lacertae

    CP Lacertae (also known as Nova Lacertae 1936 or CP Lac) was a nova, which lit up on June 18, 1936 in the constellation Lacerta. It was discovered independently by several observers including Leslie Peltier in the US and E. Loreta in Italy. The nova reached a peak brightness of 2.1 mag, making it readily visible to the naked eye during night time. Following the outbreak, the brightness of CP Lacertae decreased thereafter, falling 3 magnitudes after nine days.

  • Alpha Lacertae

    Alpha Lacertae

    Alpha Lacertae, Latinized from α Lacertae, is a single white-hued star in the constellation of Lacerta, located 103 light years from the Sun. It is the brightest star in Lacerta with an apparent visual magnitude of 3.76. The star is moving closer to the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of −4.5 km/s.

  • 15 Lacertae

    15 Lacertae (15 Lac) is a star in the constellation Lacerta. Its apparent magnitude is 4.96.

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