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<a href="/content/Iowa_Old_Capitol_Building" style="color:blue">Iowa Old Capitol Building</a>, Iowa City, 1855
Iowa Old Capitol Building, Iowa City, 1855

The University of Iowa (also known as the UI, U of I, UIowa, or simply Iowa) is a flagship public research university in Iowa City, Iowa. Founded in 1847, it is the oldest university in the state. Iowa is the second largest university in the state of Iowa, behind Iowa State University. University of Iowa is organized into eleven colleges offering more than 200 areas of study and seven professional degrees.

Located on an urban 1,700 acre campus on the banks of the Iowa River, the University of Iowa is classified as a Doctoral University with Highest Research Activity by the Carnegie Classifications. [96] The university is best known for its programs in health care, law, and the fine arts, with programs ranking among the top 25 nationally in those areas. [[CITE|undefined|http://nacubo.org/Documents/EndowmentFiles/2016-Endowment-Market-Values.pdf]] [[CITE|undefined|http://nacubo.org/Documents/EndowmentFiles/2016-Endowment-Market-Values.pdf]] The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and the Stead Family Children's Hospital are ranked nationally by U.S. News and World Report in eleven specialties. [[CITE|undefined|http://nacubo.org/Documents/EndowmentFiles/2016-Endowment-Market-Values.pdf]] The university was the original developer of the Master of Fine Arts degree and it operates the world-renowned Iowa Writer's Workshop, which has produced 17 of the university's 46 Pulitzer Prize winners. [[CITE|undefined|http://nacubo.org/Documents/EndowmentFiles/2016-Endowment-Market-Values.pdf]] [[CITE|undefined|http://nacubo.org/Documents/EndowmentFiles/2016-Endowment-Market-Values.pdf]] Iowa is a member of several prestigious research coalitions, including the Association of American Universities, the Universities Research Association, and the Big Ten Academic Alliance.

Among American universities, the University of Iowa was the first public university to open as coeducational, opened the first coeducational medical school, opened the first Department of Religious Studies at a public university, and was the first university to officially recognize an LGBT student organization. [[CITE|undefined|http://nacubo.org/Documents/EndowmentFiles/2016-Endowment-Market-Values.pdf]] The University of Iowa's 33,000 students take part in nearly 500 student organizations. [[CITE|undefined|http://nacubo.org/Documents/EndowmentFiles/2016-Endowment-Market-Values.pdf]] Hundreds of events hosted around campus every year through the Iowa "After Class" program have made Iowa City one of the "Best College Towns in America." [[CITE|undefined|http://nacubo.org/Documents/EndowmentFiles/2016-Endowment-Market-Values.pdf]] [[CITE|undefined|http://nacubo.org/Documents/EndowmentFiles/2016-Endowment-Market-Values.pdf]] Iowa's 22 varsity athletic teams, the Iowa Hawkeyes, compete in Division I of the NCAA and are members of the Big Ten Conference. The University of Iowa alumni network exceeds 250,000 graduates located around the globe.

History


The University of Iowa was founded on February 25, 1847, just 59 days after Iowa was admitted to the Union.

The first faculty offered instruction at the university beginning in March 1855 to students in the Old Mechanics Building, located where Seashore Hall is now.

The original campus consisted of the Iowa Old Capitol Building and the 10 acres (40,000 m 2 ) (4.05 hectares) of land on which it stood. Following the placing of the cornerstone July 4, 1840, the building housed the Fifth Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Iowa (December 5, 1842) and then became the first capitol building of the State of Iowa on December 28, 1846. Until that date, it had been the third capitol of the Territory of Iowa. When the capitol of Iowa was moved to Des Moines in 1857, the Old Capitol became the first permanent "home" of the University.

In 1855, Iowa became the first public university in the United States to admit men and women on an equal basis. In addition, Iowa was the world's first university to accept creative work in theater, writing, music, and art on an equal basis with academic research [[CITE|undefined|http://uiowa.edu/facts/UI-firsts/index.htm]]

The university was one of the first institutions in America to grant a law degree to a woman (Mary B. Hickey Wilkinson, 1873), to grant a law degree to an African American (Alexander G. Clark, Jr. in 1879), and to put an African American on a varsity athletic squad (Frank Holbrook in 1895). The university offered its first doctorate in 1898. [[CITE|undefined|http://uiowa.edu/facts/UI-firsts/index.htm]]

The university was the first state university to recognize the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Allied Union (in 1970).

The University of Iowa established the first law school west of the Mississippi River. It was the first university to use television in education, in 1932, and it pioneered in the field of standardized testing. [[CITE|undefined|http://now.uiowa.edu/2015/09/president-harreld]] Also, the University of Iowa was the first Big Ten institution to promote an African American to the position of administrative vice president. (Phillip Hubbard, promoted in 1966)

A shooting took place on campus on November 1, 1991. Six people died in the shooting, including the perpetrator, and one other person was wounded. This was the fifth-deadliest university shooting in United States history, tied with a shooting at Northern Illinois University.

In the summer of 2008, flood waters breached the Coralville Reservoir spillway, damaging more than 20 major campus buildings.

Later in 2008, UNESCO designated Iowa City the world's third City of Literature, making it part of the UNESCO Creative Cities Network. [[CITE|undefined|http://now.uiowa.edu/2015/09/president-harreld]] [[CITE|undefined|http://now.uiowa.edu/2015/09/president-harreld]]

In 2014, the Iowa Board of Regents proposed tying state funding largely to undergraduate resident enrollment, which would have shifted millions of dollars away from the UI to Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa. Iowa legislators ultimately did not support the plan.

In 2015, the Iowa Board of Regents selected Bruce Harreld, a business consultant with limited experience in academic administration, to succeed Sally Mason as president. The regents' choice of Harreld provoked criticism and controversy on the UI campus due to his corporate background, lack of history in leading an institution of higher education, and the circumstances related to the search process. [[CITE|undefined|http://now.uiowa.edu/2015/09/president-harreld]] [[CITE|undefined|http://now.uiowa.edu/2015/09/president-harreld]] [[CITE|undefined|http://worldcat.org/issn/0028-792X]] [[CITE|undefined|https://provost.uiowa.edu/about/p-barry-butler]] The regents said they had based their decision on the belief that Harreld could limit costs and find new sources of revenue beyond tuition in an age of declining state support for universities. [[CITE|undefined|http://worldcat.org/issn/0028-792X]]

In July 2016, the university took over the former AIB College of Business in Des Moines, where it operates the Iowa Center for Higher Education. Four bachelors' programs are offered in Des Moines; an additional four masters'-level programs are offered in Des Moines at the university's site in the city's Western Gateway Park. [[CITE|undefined|https://provost.uiowa.edu/about/p-barry-butler]] [[CITE|undefined|https://provost.uiowa.edu/about/p-barry-butler]] [[CITE|undefined|https://provost.uiowa.edu/about/p-barry-butler]] [[CITE|undefined|https://provost.uiowa.edu/about/p-barry-butler]]

Campus


The University of Iowa's main campus, located in Iowa City, was originally designed by architect D. Elwood Cook. The campus is roughly bordered by Park Road and U.S. Highway 6 to the north and Dubuque and Gilbert Streets to the east. The Iowa River flows through the campus, dividing it into west and east sides.

Of architectural note is the Pentacrest at the center of The University of Iowa campus. The Pentacrest comprises five major campus buildings: Old Capitol, Schaeffer Hall, MacLean Hall, Macbride Hall, and Jessup Hall. The Old Capitol was once the home of the state legislature and the primary government building for the State of Iowa, but is now the symbolic heart of the university with a restored ceremonial legislative chamber and a museum of Iowa history.

Also on the eastern side of campus are six residence halls (Burge, Daum, Stanley, Currier, Mayflower, and Catlett), the Iowa Memorial Union, the Women's Resource & Action Center, the Pappajohn Business Building, Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, the Lindquist Center (home of the College of Education), Phillips Hall (the foreign language building), Van Allen Hall (home to physics and astronomy), Trowbridge Hall (home to Earth & Environmental Sciences, as well as the Iowa Geological Survey), the English-Philosophy Building, the Becker Communication Building, the Adler Journalism Building, and the buildings for biology, chemistry, and psychology. The Main Library can also be found on the east side.

The Colleges of Law, Medicine, Nursing, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Public Health are on the western side of the Iowa River, along with the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, the Theatre Building, and Voxman Music Building. Additionally, five residence halls (Hillcrest, Slater, Rienow, Parklawn, and Petersen), Kinnick Stadium, and Carver-Hawkeye Arena are located on the west campus.

The Oakdale Campus, which is home to some of the university's research facilities and the driving simulator, is located north of Interstate 80 in adjacent Coralville.

The campus is home to several museums, including the University of Iowa Museum of Art, the Museum of Natural History, the Old Capitol Museum, the Medical Museum, the Athletic Hall of Fame and Museum, and Project Art at the University Hospitals and Clinics.

The flood of 2008 had a major impact on a number of campus buildings, forcing many buildings to temporarily close.

The Theatre Building has since reopened, but the music facilities have not.

The University of Iowa is one of the EPA's Green Power Partners, burning oat hulls instead of coal and reducing coal consumption by 20%.

The University also offers a Certificate in Sustainability through the Office of Sustainability (OS).

Organization and administration


The Board of Regents, State of Iowa governs The University of Iowa, as well as the state’s other public universities; Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa through policymaking, coordination, and oversight, as issued by the law.

The Iowa Boards of Regents is responsible for hiring and evaluating the performance of the president of The University of Iowa.

Academics


The University of Iowa is regularly recognized as one of the top institutions of higher learning in the country, and over 5,000 courses are offered at the university each year.

The Iowa Writers' Workshop was founded in 1936. Since 1947 it has produced thirteen Pulitzer Prize winners. Twenty-five people affiliated with the Writers' Workshop have won a Pulitzer Prize. The Hanson Center for Technical Communication was founded at The University of Iowa and is named after a 1960 graduate, Thomas R. Hanson who has funded the institution with $800,000. [[CITE|undefined|http://thegazette.com/subject/news/education/higher-education/university-of-iowa-iowa-state-look-to-dial-down-enrollment-growth-20160908]]

The university has educated many of the state's professionals including 79% of Iowa's dentists, 50% of Iowa's physicians, 48% of Iowa's pharmacists, as well as teachers and administrators in each of the state's K–12 school districts.

The University of Iowa library system is the state's largest library and comprises the Main Library, the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, five branch libraries, and the Law Library.

For 2017, University of Iowa was ranked tied for 82nd among national universities, tied for 33rd among public universities, and tied for 130th among global universities by U.S. News & World Report . [[CITE|undefined|http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/university-of-iowa-153658/overall-rankings]]

For 2017, U.S. News & World Report ranked 16 University of Iowa graduate programs among the top 25 in the nation. [[CITE|undefined|http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/university-of-iowa-153658/overall-rankings]] In graduate school rankings for 2017, U.S. News & World Report ranked Iowa's Carver College of Medicine tied for 25th in the country for primary care and tied for 33rd in the country for research, its College of Public Health tied for 17th, its College of Pharmacy tied for 17th, its College of Law tied for 20th, and its Nursing School tied for 23rd. [[CITE|undefined|http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/university-of-iowa-153658/overall-rankings]]

In its most recent rankings of institutions, the National Science Foundation ranks Iowa 49th in the nation in research and development expenditures. [[CITE|undefined|https://brand.uiowa.edu/color-palette]]

  • Institute of Agricultural Medicine. The Institute of Agricultural Medicine was established in 1955 with a grant from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation as an institute to study rural public health issues. [[CITE|undefined|https://brand.uiowa.edu/color-palette]] It was later renamed to the Institute of Agricultural Medicine and Occupational Health.
  • IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering (Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research).
  • Public Policy Center. The Public Policy Center (PPC) is an interdisciplinary academic research center investigating six policy areas: Environmental, Health, Housing & Land Use, Human Factors & Vehicle Safety, Social Science, and Transportation.

Student life


The University of Iowa is well known for its party and social scene: it was ranked 1st in The Princeton Review's 2014 list of top party schools, [[CITE|undefined|https://brand.uiowa.edu/color-palette]] and given the rank of 10th-best party school in the United States by Playboy

There are also over 500 student organizations, including groups focused on politics, sports, games, lifestyles, dance, song, and theater, and a variety of other activities.

Athletics


The University of Iowa has 22 varsity athletic teams, known as the Hawkeyes. All teams are members of the Big Ten Conference in the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I. There are 10 men's teams and 12 women's teams.

The most successful team at Iowa is the men's wrestling team, who have won 23 of the school's 25 NCAA championships. 15 of those championships occurred during Dan Gable's 21-year tenure as head coach (1977-1997). They have 35 Big Ten titles, 81 individual NCAA Titles, and have graduated 17 Olympians. [[CITE|undefined|http://hawkeyesports.com/sports/m-wrestl/spec-rel/mediaguide1415.html]] The team is currently coached by alumnus Tom Brands.

Iowa's football team is one of the most financially valuable college football teams in the country. [[CITE|undefined|http://businessinsider.com/the-25-schools-that-make-the-most-money-in-college-football-2013-1?op=1]] They have won 11 Big Ten championships and claim a share of the 1958 national championship. The program has produced 10 members of the College Football Hall of Fame, 24 consensus first-team All-Americans, and 245 NFL Draft Picks. [[CITE|undefined|http://winsipedia.com/iowa]] The team is currently coached by Kirk Ferentz, who is in his 17th year following coach Hayden Fry, who coached the previous 20 seasons.

The Iowa Hawkeyes field hockey team is the most successful women's team at the university, winning the 1986 national championship. They have won 13 conference titles and have made 11 Final Four appearances in the 33-year history of the NCAA tournament, despite field hockey not being a high school sport in Iowa. [[CITE|undefined|http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/big10/sports/w-fieldh/auto_pdf/2014-15/misc_non_event/FHRecordsBook.pdf]] The program has produced 85 All-Americans and 13 Olympians. [[CITE|undefined|http://bigten.org/sports/w-fieldh/spec-rel/120114aab.html]] The program is currently coached by Lisa Celluci.

Other sports at the university include basketball, soccer, baseball, softball, gymnastics, golf, swimming and diving, tennis, track and field, volleyball, cross country, and rowing.

Notable alumni and faculty


Among the thousands of graduates from the University of Iowa, especially notable alumni include George Gallup, founder of the Gallup Poll, BA, 1923; Tennessee Williams, author of "A Streetcar Named Desire" and "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" BA, 1938; Gene Wilder, Comedic film and television actor whose credits include "Silver Streak," "Young Frankenstein," and "Stir Crazy" BA, 1955, Communication and Theatre Arts; James Van Allen, world-famous physicist and discoverer of two radiation belts (the Van Allen Belts) that surround the earth, Emeritus Carver Professor of Physics at the University of Iowa. MS, 1936; PhD, 1939, Physics; (Mary) Flannery O'Connor, novelist and author of numerous short stories, MFA, 1947, English; Sarai Sherman, a twentieth century modernist painter whose work is in major national and international collections including MoMA, the Whitney Museum of American Art; and the Hirshhorn Museum; and John Irving, novelist who wrote The World According to Garp , A Prayer for Owen Meany , and several others, MFA, 1967, English. Tom Brokaw, Mark Mattson and Ashton Kutcher also attended the University of Iowa.

See also


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