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This list contains all spacewalks and moonwalks performed from 1965 to 1999 where an astronaut has fully or partially left a spacecraft. Entries for moonwalks are shown with a gray background while entries for all other EVAs are uncolored.

All spacewalks have had the astronauts tethered to their spacecraft except for seven spacewalks by the United States (six in 1984 using the Manned Maneuvering Unit, and one in 1994 testing the SAFER rescue device). All moonwalks were performed with astronauts untethered, and some of the astronauts traveled far enough to lose visual contact with their craft (they were up to 7.6 km away from it using the Lunar Roving Vehicle). One lunar EVA was not a moonwalk, but rather a stand-up EVA partially out the top hatch of the LM, where it was thought that the extra height would help with surveying the area prior to conducting the moonwalks. Only three deep-space EVAs have ever been conducted, where the activity was neither on the lunar surface nor in low Earth orbit, but far away from both the Moon and the Earth.

1965–1969 spacewalks and moonwalks


Spacewalk beginning and ending times are given in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

1970–1979 spacewalks and moonwalks


Spacewalk beginning and ending times are given in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

1980–1984 spacewalks


Spacewalk beginning and ending times are given in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

1985–1989 spacewalks


Spacewalk beginning and ending times are given in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

1990–1994 spacewalks


Spacewalk beginning and ending times are given in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

1995–1999 spacewalks


Spacewalk beginning and ending times are given in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

For spacewalks that took place from 2000 through 2014, see List of spacewalks 2000–2014. For spacewalks that took place from the beginning of 2015 on, see List of spacewalks since 2015.

Commemorative stamps


The first spacewalk, that of the Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov was commemorated in several Eastern Bloc stamps (see the stamps section in the Alexei Leonov article). Since the Soviet Union did not distribute diagrams or images of the Voskhod 2 spacecraft at the time, the spaceship depiction in the stamps was purely fictional. In 1967 the U.S. Post Office issued a postage stamp commemorating the first American to float freely in space while orbiting the Earth. The engraved image has accurate depiction of the Gemini IV spacecraft and the space suit worn by astronaut Ed White.[150]

See also


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