You Might Like
Beetroots on the stem
Beetroots on the stem

The beetroot is the taproot portion of a beet plant,[1]Oxford%20En]]sually known in North America as the beet n as the table beet, garden beet, sugar beet, red beet, dinner beet or golden beet. It is one of several cultivated varieties of Beta vulgaris grown for their edible taproots and leaves (called beet greens); they have been classified as B. vulgaris subsp. vulgaris 'Conditiva' Group.[2]

Besides being used as a food, beets have uses as a food colouring and as a medicinal plant. Many beet products are made from other Beta vulgaris varieties, particularly sugar beet.

Etymology


Beta is the ancient Latin name for beets,[3] possibly of Celtic origin, becoming bete in Old English around 1400.[4] Root derives from the late Old English rōt, itself from Old Norse rót.[5]

History


From the Middle Ages, beetroot was used as a treatment for a variety of conditions, especially illnesses relating to digestion and the blood. Bartolomeo Platina recommended taking beetroot with garlic to nullify the effects of "garlic-breath".[6]

During the middle of the 19th century, wine often was coloured with beetroot juice.[7]

Cultivars


Below is a list of several commonly available cultivars of beets. Generally, 55 to 65 days are needed from germination to harvest of the root. All cultivars can be harvested earlier for use as greens. Unless otherwise noted, the root colours are shades of red and dark red with different degrees of zoning noticeable in slices.

  • 'Albino', heirloom (white root)
  • 'Bull's Blood', heirloom[8]
  • 'Chioggia', heirloom (distinct red and white zoned root)[9]
  • 'Crosby's Egyptian', heirloom
  • 'Cylindra' / 'Formanova', heirloom (elongated root)[9]
  • 'Detroit Dark Red Medium Top', heirloom
  • 'Early Wonder', heirloom
  • 'Golden Beet' / 'Burpee's Golden', heirloom (yellow root)[9]
  • 'MacGregor's Favorite', an heirloom carrot-shaped beet[10][11]
  • 'Perfected Detroit', 1934 AAS winner[12]
  • 'Red Ace' Hybrid
  • 'Ruby Queen', 1957 AAS winner[13]
  • 'Touchstone Gold' (yellow root)

Food


Usually the deep purple roots of beetroot are eaten boiled, roasted, or raw, and either alone or combined with any salad vegetable.

The domestication of beets can be traced to the emergence of an allele which enables biennial harvesting of leaves and taproot.[15]

Beetroot can be boiled or steamed, peeled, and then eaten warm with or without butter as a delicacy; cooked, pickled, and then eaten cold as a condiment; or peeled, shredded raw, and then eaten as a salad. Pickled beets are a traditional food in many countries.

A traditional Pennsylvania Dutch dish is pickled beet egg. Hard-boiled eggs are refrigerated in the liquid left over from pickling beets and allowed to marinate until the eggs turn a deep pink-red colour.

In Poland and Ukraine, beet is combined with horseradish to form popular ćwikła or бурачки (burachky), which is traditionally used with cold cuts and sandwiches, but often also added to a meal consisting of meat and potatoes. Similarly in Serbia where the popular cvekla is used as winter salad, seasoned with salt and vinegar, with meat dishes. As an addition to horseradish, it is also used to produce the "red" variety of chrain, a popular condiment in Ashkenazi Jewish, Hungarian, Polish, Lithuanian, Russian, and Ukrainian cuisine.

Popular in Australian hamburgers, a slice of pickled beetroot is combined with other condiments on a beef patty to make an Aussie burger.

In Northern Germany, beetroot is mashed with Labskaus or added as its side order. [16][17]

When beet juice is used, it is most stable in foods with a low water content, such as frozen novelties and fruit fillings.[18] Betanins, obtained from the roots, are used industrially as red food colourants, e.g. to intensify the colour of tomato paste, sauces, desserts, jams and jellies, ice cream, sweets, and breakfast cereals.[14]

Beetroot can also be used to make wine.[19]

A moderate amount of chopped beetroot is sometimes added to the Japanese pickle fukujinzuke

Food shortages in Europe following World War I caused great hardships, including cases of mangelwurzel disease, as relief workers called it. It was symptomatic of eating only beets.[20]

Nutrition


Raw beetroot is 88% water, 10% carbohydrates, 2% protein, and less than 1% fat (see table). In a 100-gram amount providing 43 calories, raw beetroot is a rich source (27% of the Daily Value - DV) of folate and a moderate source (16% DV) of manganese, with other nutrients having insignificant content (table).[21]

Preliminary research


In preliminary research, beetroot juice reduced blood pressure in hypertensive people.[22] Tentative evidence has found that dietary nitrate supplementation, such as from beets and other vegetables, results in a small improvement in endurance exercise performance.[23]

Other uses


Betanin, obtained from the roots, is used industrially as red food colorant, to improve the color and flavor of tomato paste, sauces, desserts, jams and jellies, ice cream, candy, and breakfast cereals, among other applications.[14]

The chemical adipic acid rarely occurs in nature, but happens to occur naturally in beetroot.

Safety


The red colour compound betanin is not broken down in the body, and in higher concentrations may temporarily cause urine or stools to assume a reddish colour, in the case of urine a condition called beeturia.[24] Although harmless, this effect may cause initial concern due to the visual similarity to what appears to be blood in the stool, hematochezia (blood passing through the anus, usually in or with stool) or hematuria (blood in the urine).[25]

Nitrosamine formation in beet juice can reliably be prevented by adding ascorbic acid.[26]

See also


You Might Like